Golden Globes History: Millenium Approaches (1980-1999)

by Ana Maria Bahiana November 29, 2017
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Cher, Golden Globe winner 1984
Kathleen Turner, Dudley Moore, 1985
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Miami Vice stars Don Johnson and Edward James Olmos
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The last years of the 20th Century are expansive times - optimism reigns, hair is big and shoulders are strong. All the while, in silence at first, the terrible AIDS scourge wreaks havoc in the industry, cutting a path of destruction through friendships, families and entire cities. Firmly established in the International Ballroom of the Beverly Hilton, in Beverly Hills, the Golden Globes are a televised event with the requisite red carpet, enthusiastic fans and a battery of flashbulbs and TV cameras. It is also a family affair - stars come with their spouses, sometimes their whole families. Hollywood churns out big (that word again...) action movies, and a new wave of independent filmmakers offer a counterpoint to big entertainment with smaller, more intimate explorations.

Learn more about the Globes in the 80s.