Babel movie poster

Golden Globe winner Babel by Alejandro Iñarritu is a multi-narrative, ensemble cast drama completing the director’s so-called death trilogy,  following Amores Perros and 21 Grams. The film portrays four interlocking stories taking place in four countries on three continents, Morocco, Japan, Mexico and the U.S, showing how connected we really are by looking into the lives of seemingly random people around the world.

Babel garnered seven Golden Globes nominations, and won one, for Best Picture, Drama. The other films nominated in the category at the 64th Golden Globe Awards were The Departed, The Queen (for which Helen Mirren won Best Actress – as well as the Academy Award), Bobby and Little Children. Forest Whitaker won the Globe as Best Actor, Drama for The Last King of Scotland. Leonardo DiCaprio was nominated at the Globes in the same category, twice, for The Departed and Blood Diamond. Babel's co-stars, Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett (playing the married couple vacationing in Morocco), would later play a couple again in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008); both films were nominated as Best Picture at the Golden Globes.

Iñarritu also was nominated for his direction, but Scorsese won for The Departed. Arnold Schwarzenegger, then California's Governor, presented the Golden Globe for Best Picture, Drama to Iñarritu, who said: “Governor, I swear I have my papers in order! [laughs]... We are receiving this award on behalf of more than 1,500 people who worked on this film on three different continents and in five different languages... the power of cinema is universal: emotions don't need translation, and that's the beauty of it. This award is also very meaningful for the Mexican film industry, and I want to thank my dear friends and colleagues Guillermo del Toro and Alfonso Cuarón.”

Mexican actress Adriana Barraza was nominated for her role as the nanny in Babel (Jennifer Hudson won for Dreamgirls): in real life, Barraza had a long history of heart problems, and yet she insisted on carrying young co-star Elle Fanning around in the desert for the two days of filming. Furthermore, she accepted to gain many pounds for that role.

The critical consensus was unanimous. As a reviewer wrote, "In Babel, there are no villains, only victims of fate and circumstance. Director Iñarritu weaves four of their woeful stories into this mature and multidimensional film.”